Our people have deep experience in the area they work in. Some of them share this experience in their blogs - take a look here:

Hear, Hear! Queensland Health deploys Microsoft Dynamics CRM to expand its Healthy Hearing program

Hear, Hear! Queensland Health deploys Microsoft Dynamics CRM to expand its Healthy Hearing program

Click the link to a recent post in the Microsoft Australia Blog "The Big Picture" that talks about some of the excellent work that Simient has completed in the Health industry. 

Click the link to a recent post in the Microsoft Australia Blog "The Big Picture" that talks about some of the excellent work that Simient has completed in the Health industry.  http://bit.ly/1uq7Jdb

John StevensonJohn Stevenson more

Diagnostics Tool for CRM2011

Diagnostics Tool for CRM2011

I found myself having an issue with the CRM Email Router for a newly configured mailbox. The CRM solution had an existing queue, which I used to set and approve the email address …

I found myself having an issue with the CRM Email Router for a newly configured mailbox. The CRM solution had an existing queue, which I used to set and approve the email address of new the mailbox I had created. However after successfully testing the email router deployment for the mailbox, when I sent an email to the new mailbox, the CRM Email router was giving the following error: "At least one system user or queue in the organization must be a recipient."

But I did have a queue setup as a recipient? By using the below tool, I was easily able to start and then view the CRM trace files. Digging deep into them, I saw the real error, instead of what I can assume is a "catch all" type error that was being reported. In the end the real error was that the queue's owner had no permissions. Specifically, it needed write permission on the email Activity entity.

http://crmdiagtool2011.codeplex.com/
Diagnostics Tool for Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 helps CRM developers and administrators to enable trace and devErrors on CRM server.

 

Adrian LaunchburyAdrian Launchbury more

The holidays are over - what now?

The holidays are over - what now?

I love the Summer holidays. Work slows down, many businesses shut between Christmas and New Year. Some, like me, have the drive with the kids to catch up with relatives, followed …

I love the Summer holidays. Work slows down, many businesses shut between Christmas and New Year. Some, like me, have the drive with the kids to catch up with relatives, followed by the frenzied domestic clean up to get ready for another year of work.

I don't particularly like crowds and queues, but the holidays are a time when they cannot be avoided. There are traffic queues like the one heading North out of Sydney on Boxing Day, luckily we were heading South to Canberra so missed out on the worst of the coastal traffic that day. There is also the almost obligatory New Years Eve fireworks.

This year, we were in the beautiful sea side town of Forster, NSW . It seemed like half of Sydney had decided to spend New Year's Eve at Forster, so there were two things I dislike, crowds and queues. The family convinced me that we had to go to the foreshore to see the fireworks and being in the mood to please agreed and drove everyone down there. We parked a little away from the main hubbub so eliminated traffic queues and got to do something I like, walking.

I have not been a fan of big fireworks displays mainly because of the cost. When I see things like the 2015 Sydney fireworks costing more than $7 million, I have often wondered how that money may have otherwise been spent on other social issues. I do understand that the $7 million generated over $100 million in economic benefits, however it does make me wonder and hence takes my attention away from the awe of the pyrotechnic spectacle.

With my new resolve to do more to go with the flow I just watched the Foster fireworks. I blocked out the annoying thoughts of "waste of public money". I did get bitten by a mosquito, but my brother in law had some repellent so that didn't become an issue. Watching the fireworks it suddenly dawned on me that there is massive relevance in exploding stuff on New Year's Eve. The fireworks represent all the emotions of the year just gone. All the tragedies and triumphs. All the joy and sadness. All the efforts and rewards. It all gets shot into the sky and blown apart in a display of power, beauty and wonder. It puts a significant end to the year. It gives it a dramatic finality.

The old year is done, what is in store for the next? Sitting at my work desk this morning for the first time in 2015 I am planning. I am looking at all the things I need to do to make this year a success. Understanding the targets that I want to reach and understanding the resources that I will need to achieve them. Last year is over, we've had the fireworks to prove it. I am focussed on the outcomes of this year.

John StevensonJohn Stevenson more

Estimating at Simient

Estimating at Simient

How do we at Simient estimate?

 

Well, generally we Estimate by Analogy, based on previous systems and functionality that we have delivered.

 

 

This is the most ‘comf…

How do we at Simient estimate?

 

Well, generally we Estimate by Analogy, based on previous systems and functionality that we have delivered.

 

 

This is the most ‘comfortable’ way of estimating because it concerns the ‘known’. This method of estimating has held Simient in good stead with a high level of accuracy. We capture and review our estimates at the end of each project using the data to improve future estimates….

 

However, what if the technology or platform is unfamiliar or new?

Well, alternatively we may use a more scientific method such as the Functional Point Method of estimating based on

  • Input files and input transactions (batch interfaces)

  • Screens (adds, changes, deletes)

  • Control Information

  • Internal Logical Files (tables, files with data, control files)

  • External tables and referenced files from other applications

  • Output files and transactions (batch interfaces)

  • Other outputs - reports, files, DVDs, views, notices, warnings

     

    Another method we use at Simient is Three Point Estimation (or PERT) based on

  • Best Guess Estimate (Optimistic or O)

  • Most Likely Estimate (M)

  • Worst case estimate (Pessimistic or P)

    and identifying the ‘weighted’ average O + 4M + P divided by 6

     

    This method has proved most useful allowing Simient to tailor estimates to the level of

  • uncertainty,

  • perceived risk and

  • complexity

Three Point Estimation can be applied to a whole system or just to specific complex tasks…

 

Critically however, the key point regarding estimating, regardless of the method, is to capture and review your estimates with each project building your data, working towards continuous improvement and increasing the accuracy of your future estimates….

 

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